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Unable to keep up with the surge in COVID-19 cases, the United States has been forced to reduce the workload of contact tracing

American social management from the mirror of anti-pandemic

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Unable to keep up with the surge in COVID-19 cases, the United States has been forced to reduce the workload of contact tracing

As the novel coronavirus spreads rapidly in most parts of the United States, overburdened state and local health officials are reducing the contact tracing workload or even giving up completely.

In the early stage of the epidemic, public health workers across the United States have tried to trace the infection chain. Within 48 hours of a person’s virus test positive, they will receive an inquiry call, providing information about the places they have visited and possible contacts. Relevant departments will track everyone that the virus carrier may have contacted, police Sue them to quarantine and be tested.

The analysis suggests that the current U.S. outbreak is worsening, and public health agencies have now acknowledged that contact tracing has become more difficult. As Dr. Nilav Shah, Maine’s head of COVID-19 response, said: “COVID-19 spreads faster in Maine and the nation as a whole than the states have trained and deployed public health investigators. We have to make this difficult decision.” CCTV reporter Gu Xiang)

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