Site icon YCNews

Plan to inoculate 20 million actual 2.8 million! What are the reasons for the slow distribution of coronavirus vaccines in the United States?

Plan to inoculate 20 million actual 2.8 million! What are the reasons for the slow distribution of coronavirus vaccines in the United States?

The Florida government recently said that so far, less than a quarter of the state has been vaccinated against the novel coronavirus, and many elderly people stay up late to wait outdoors for vaccination.

It is reported that many parts of the United States have problems such as slow and untimely vaccine distribution, which makes the process of the U.S. coronavirus vaccine distribution plan far behind the original plan, which has raised Americans’ concerns about whether the country can quickly control the novel coronavirus pneumonia.

U.S. federal officials have said that their goal is to vacculate 20 million Americans with the first dose of vaccine by the end of 2020.

However, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of December 30, local time, only 2.8 million Americans had been vaccinated with the first dose of the vaccine.

Federal officials said they did not know much about the delay. But health officials and hospitals in various states in the United States believe that the following two points are the main reasons for the slow distribution of vaccines.

One is the limited capacity of local health officials and hospitals in the United States to deal with many complex details, such as scheduling and staffing, in the final phase of vaccine distribution.

Dr. Ashish Ja, dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health, calls local health agencies and hospitals “the least resourced place in the country,” but asks them to do “the hardest jobs.”

Many states in the United States have now had to delay the dose of vaccines in nursing homes and other long-term care institutions due to insufficient resources or manpower. Currently, only 8% of the doses have been distributed across the United States, and 2 million doses have not yet been distributed.

Second, the hesitation of the United States about vaccines has also slowed down the distribution of vaccines. About 60 percent of nursing home workers in the state refuse to get the vaccine, Gov. Mike DeWine said at a December 30, 2020 press conference.

The chief executive of the Florida Safety Net Hospital Coalition also said that in Florida, some hospital workers have refused to receive vaccines due to safety concerns, which have now been designated to other vulnerable groups.

Exit mobile version