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Japan’s Deputy Prime Minister said it was okay to drink and treat nuclear wastewater? Japanese netizen: You drink first

Japan's Deputy Prime Minister said it was okay to drink and treat nuclear wastewater? Japanese netizen: You drink first

On the morning of the 13th local time, the Japanese government held a cabinet meeting and formally decided to discharge the nuclear wastewater stored in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company into the sea. This decision of the Japanese government caused an uproar all over the world.

Japan’s Deputy Prime Minister said it was okay to drink and treat nuclear wastewater.

Japanese netizen: You drink first

On social media, Japanese netizens have been branding “opposing the discharge of nuclear wastewater into the sea” for several days. At present, more than 45,000 netizens have participated, saying that “nuclear wastewater cannot flow to the sea”.

According to Japan’s economic news, Taro Aso, Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister of Japan, told reporters after the cabinet meeting: “It is long overdue to do so according to scientific evidence” and said that “it’s okay to drink those water”.

In response, some Japanese netizens angrily posted: “If you really think so, drink it first!”

There are also Japanese netizens who made up a song on this topic: “Drink it, drink it, drink it until it is harmful to health!”

Some netizens pointed out, “The reason why Tokyo Electric Power Company said there was no place to put water storage tanks is deceptive. They just don’t want to spend more money on a useless nuclear power plant!”

Decisions against Japan Many countries expressed their positions

China: Japan is extremely irresponsible

Zhao Lijian, spokesman of the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said at a regular press conference on the 13th that Japan’s practice of discharging pollutants into the sea is extremely irresponsible.

On the 13th, the South Korean government urgently convened a meeting of deputy ministers of relevant departments under the chairmanship of the State Adjustment Office, Ju Runzhe. At the press conference after the meeting, Ju Runzhe said that South Korea could not accept the Japanese government’s decision to discharge pollutants into the sea.

In addition, the Ministry of Marine and Aquaculture of South Korea said on the 13th that it was discussing the retroactive supervision of Japanese seafood.

On the 13th local time, the Japanese government held an online video briefing to the Japanese-based agencies on the discharge of nuclear wastewater into the sea. According to Japanese media reports, a total of 60 representatives from 49 countries, regions and international organizations attended the seminar. South Korea did not attend the meeting in the countries and regions around Japan.

Russia: The Japanese government did not consult with neighboring countries when making a decision.

On the evening of the 13th local time, the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued a statement on its website, saying that the Japanese government did not consult with neighboring countries, including Russia, and did not provide enough official information when making the decision.

Russia hopes to obtain a more detailed explanation from Japan on the discharge of nuclear sewage and allow the outside world to monitor the radiation situation in the region if necessary.

The U.S. State Department expressed support, and the Secretary of State actually issued a “thank you” note.

In response to the decision of the Japanese government, neighboring countries expressed their firm opposition and serious concern. However, the U.S. State Department issued a statement in support of the Japanese government’s decision to discharge pollutants into the sea. U.S. Secretary of State Blincoln even “thanks” Japan on social media. Such remarks also caused an uproar on social media in the United States. Many American netizens have stepped forward to express their anger, saying that this attitude and practice is unbelievable, and it is another “double standard” behavior of the United States.

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