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Iraq will prosecute the U.S. government: violation of Iraq’s sovereignty and the use of depleted uranium bombs against civilians

U.S. Central Command says it has no plans to withdraw troops from Iraq

030527-N-5362A-001 Al Hillah, Iraq (May, 27th 2003) Ð Engineering Aide 1st Class Scott Lyerla, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One Five (NMCB-15) maintains security for his convoy with an M-60 machine gun while driving through Al Hillah, Iraq. Operation Iraqi Freedom is the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Arlo K. Abrahamson. (RELEASED)

December 15 – An adviser to the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Iraqi Parliament said that Baghdad is planning to file an international lawsuit against the U.S. government to hold the United States responsible for violating Iraq’s sovereignty and using internationally prohibited weapons in civilian areas.

According to Iran’s Pars Today on the 15th, Hatif al-Rikabi told the Arabic magazine Information Agency that Iraq will bring lawsuits in Swedish and German courts for the appalling crimes committed by Washington in Iraq, including the use of depleted uranium weapons.

Ricarby said that these measures will ensure that the United States fulfills its international responsibilities without giving it the opportunity to delay the case.

It is reported that the coalition led by the United States left hundreds of tons of depleted uranium ammunition and other toxic waste during the Iraq war.

Official statistics from the Iraqi government show that before the outbreak of the First Persian Gulf War in 1991, the cancer case ratio in Iraq was 40/100,000. By 1995, the number had increased to 800 people/100,000. By 2005, the data had doubled to at least 1,600 people/100,000 people. Current statistics show that the growth trend continues.

According to the report, uranium bomb pollution and other military-related pollution are suspected to be responsible for the sharp increase in congenital defects, cancer cases and other diseases of the people in most parts of Iraq.

Many doctors and scientists insist that the recent emergence of previously unexistent diseases in Iraq, such as new diseases of the kidneys, lungs and liver, and a complete collapse of the immune system, are related to public exposure to war pollutants.

Depleted uranium (DU) contamination may also be associated with the large increase in leukemia, kidney disease and anemia, especially in children. In addition, abortion and premature delivery of Iraqi women have also increased sharply, especially in areas where a large number of U.S. military operations have taken place, such as Fallujah.

From the end of March 2003 to 2011, the withdrawal of U.S. troops, mainly the U.S. and British forces, launched the Iraq War and overthrew the then Iraqi government. During 2004, the U.S. military used a large amount of depleted uranium ammunition and white phosphorus to carry out two large military attacks on the Iraqi city of Fallujah.

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