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Greenland recorded its first record for the highest point of rain on the ice sheet

Greenland recorded its first record for the highest point of rain on the ice sheet

In recent years, the trend of global warming has become more and more obvious. Scientists said on the 20th, the recent Arctic Greenland ice sheet at the highest point of rain phenomenon, this is the first time on record.

Walter Mayer, senior research scientist at the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Research Center, said: Greenland’s highest point this past week, at an altitude of 10,500 feet, about 3,200 meters, about 72.5 degrees north latitude, has been raining for hours, something that has not been recorded.

Scientists say the Greenland ice sheet’s highest point of 3,216 meters above sea level began to rain on the 14th, with temperatures above 0C lasting about nine hours. From the 14th to the 16th, about 7 billion tons of rain fell, the highest since records began in 1950.

The Greenland ice sheet is the second largest in the world, covering an area of nearly 1.8 million square kilometers, second only to the Antarctic ice sheet. The Greenland ice sheet has recently melted, with Danish researchers saying late last month that the greenland ice sheet was losing about 8 billion tons of ice a day. That’s twice the rate at which ice melts in the summer of previous years.

Walter Mayer, senior research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Research Center, says a 2C rise in temperatures in the mid-latitudes may not feel much, but it’s different when temperatures rise from minus 1C to minus 1C. If you’re in the Arctic Ocean, the difference is the difference between skating and swimming, so the small changes we see can have a big impact, which is a sign of a bigger impact, and we’re starting to see that impact in mid-latitudes, like more wildfires, more heat, more extreme weather.

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