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FBI considers adding participants in the Capitol protest conflict to the no-fly list.

FBI agents had a gun battle with suspects while enforcing the law. At least two people were killed and injured.

On January 20, 2017, Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on Capitol Hill in Washington.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) said on January 12 local time that it was considering adding those who attacked the Capitol last week to the federal no-fly list to prevent them from boarding the plane.

Steven DeAntono, assistant director of the FBI in Washington, D.C., said that the FBI is considering adding participants to the riot on the no-fly list managed by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).

“[How to confirm] the no-fly list,” DeAntono said. “We looked at all the tools and technologies available to the FBI, and we’re actively studying that.”

Congressional leaders urged on the 12th local time to ban the flight of riot participants, saying that most of them are still controlling blind spots by supervisory agencies. “We cannot allow these mobs to board the plane, causing more violence and more damage,” Sen. Chuck Schumer said during a press conference on the afternoon of the 12th.

In a letter, Democratic and Republican leaders of the U.S. Homeland Security Council told Transportation Security Administration Director David Pekoschi that they feared that “there are too little effort to disrupt terrorist travel, and they have just attacked the U.S. government and hope to do so again.”

It is reported that the no-fly list is extracted from the terrorist screening database maintained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The U.S. government does not make a list of flights banned.

When a person checks in, he or she checks his or she is checking his or her booking information against the Transportation Security Administration’s secure flight database, including determining whether a passenger is on a no-flying or surveillance list.

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