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Australian study finds that excessive intake of “junk food” can easily lead to sleep problems in teenagers.

Australian study finds that excessive intake of "junk food" can easily lead to sleep problems in teenagers.

Sydney, January 2 A new study led by the University of Queensland in Australia found that teenagers who eat carbonated drinks and fast food frequently are more likely to have sleep disorders.

The data used in this study are derived from the World Health Organization’s Global Survey of School Health from 2009 to 2016.

The survey covered 175,261 students between the ages of 12 and 15 in 64 high, middle and low-income countries in Southeast Asia, Africa, South America and parts of the Eastern Mediterranean.

“Carbonated drinks often contain caffeine, fast food is often high in calories but lacks nutrition.

If you eat these foods too often, the probability of sleep disorders is also increasing.” “Assad Khan, a fellow and associate professor at the University of Queensland School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, said.

The study found that teenagers who drink more than three cups of carbonated drinks a day are 55% more likely to have sleep disorders than their peers who drink only one cup a day.

Male teenagers who eat fast food more than four days a week are 55% more likely to have sleep disorders than male teenagers who eat fast food only once a week, and this is 49% more likely than female teenagers.

The study also found that frequent intake of carbonated drinks and fast food in the countries covered by the survey was widespread in countries other than low-income countries.

Teenagers in high-income countries have shown a higher correlation in the development of sleep disorders and the intake of carbonated drinks.

Asad Khan said that poor sleep quality can have a negative impact on the health and cognitive development of adolescents.

He called on schools to create an atmosphere that restrict the supply of carbonated drinks and fast food, and suggested that families also focus on developing healthy eating habits.

The study has been published in the journal Electronic Clinical Medicine of the Lancet in the United Kingdom.

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