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Australian Soldiers Complain: Deploying pandemic prevention is more painful than staying overseas. They eat bad and are not allowed to go out.

Australian Soldiers Complain: Deploying pandemic prevention is more painful than staying overseas. They eat bad and are not allowed to go out.

Source ABC

December 3rd – An anonymous Australian soldier recently revealed that during the deployment of Melbourne to respond to the epidemic, the soldiers ate poorly and were not allowed to go out for months in hotels. The conditions were not as good as staying overseas. The army’s superiors seriously ignored taxis. Soldier’s mental health.

The soldier said that he was sent to Melbourne between June and October this year to help deal with the epidemic. He and his companions spent several months in the Melbourne hotel room, during which he had carried out a number of tasks, including accompanying ambulance personnel to deal with traffic accidents. However, many people are deeply affected by “confinement”. They are only allowed to leave the hotel when they are quarantined at home.

“It’s crazy. This is the worst experience I have ever had.” He said, “During the day, I drove all day and then went back to the hotel room and couldn’t see the sun.” The soldier said that they had not rested for weeks for a while, lost a lot of weight, and many people were unable to pass the physical test after returning to the barracks.

Image Source: ABC

“Many people are having a hard time. We have been in a state of marginal isolation. The soldier said that it was served with “second-rate, lowest-rate” food, only beans and rice for breakfast, and the inability to leave the hotel to buy food, which demoralized everyone. This experience is worse than stationed overseas, especially for soldiers who support ambulance personnel. Now the deployment mission is over, but the army has not tested the soldiers for mental health.

The head of an Australian defense veterans charity said: “The number of people served by the institution has increased by about 30% compared with the same period last year. It is clear that the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on individuals and families, the disconnected and lack of access to services, have been particularly prominent this year.”

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