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70% of medical staff in Hokkaido, Japan, have a heavy mental burden. In addition to the virus, they are also worried about defamation.

70% of medical staff in Hokkaido, Japan, have a heavy mental burden. In addition to the virus, they are also worried about defamation.

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December 10 Recently, a group infection occurred in many places in Hokkaido, Japan, and the medical system fell into crisis. On the 9th, the Hokkaido Medical Labor Combination Federation released an emergency survey of local doctors and nurses. The results showed that due to the rapid spread of the epidemic, about 60% of nursing personnel have a physical burden and about 70% have a mental burden.

According to a report by Japan’s Asahi Shimbun on the 10th, the survey targeted 305 nursing personnel in Hokkaido hospitals and elderly care institutions, and carried out written statistics. When asked about “thing painful at work”, 73.4% answered “mental burden” and 65.2% answered “physical burden”. 54.4% of people answered “wage, working conditions” and 12.8% replied “slander”.

When it comes to the specific content of mental burden, 35% of people are “feared and worried about infection”. When it comes to physical burden, 22.5% of people are distressed by “not enough manpower”. The specific content of “slander” includes “people around us keep a distance from themselves” and “someone calls in the middle of the night to ask if we have coronavirus patients here” and so on.

On the 9th, Suzuki Midori, executive chairman of the Hokkaido Medical Labor Group, said at a press conference: “The nurses working on the front line of medical care endure tension and fear while working hard.

COVID-19 has caused the deterioration of the operation of medical institutions, the salary has also been reduced, and the work with a sense of mission alone is almost to the limit. I hope that the Hokkaido government and the state will issue countermeasures as soon as possible to let the caregivers work at ease.

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